Please note that this summary only contains information from the full scientific abstract: View ESMO Scientific Abstract

Gene changes in people with kidney cancer who took sunitinib after kidney surgery

Date of summary: September 2019

Study number: NCT00375674

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Study start date: August 2007 |

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Study end date: September 2017

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The full title of this abstract is: Phase 3 trial of adjuvant sunitinib in patients with high-risk renal cell carcinoma: comprehensive genomic and transcriptomic analyses

This study drug is not approved in Europe to treat the condition under study that is discussed in this summary.

 

Researchers must look at the results of many types of studies to understand whether a study drug works, how it works, and whether it is safe to prescribe to patients.

This summary reports the results of only one study. The results of this study might be different from the results of other studies that the researchers look at.

 

More information can be found in the scientific
abstract of this study, which you can access here:
View ESMO Scientific Abstract

What did this study look at?

  • Renal cell carcinoma (RCC for short) is the most common type of kidney cancer.
  • Some people with RCC are at high risk of their cancer returning after having surgery to remove the kidney affected by cancer (known as nephrectomy).
    • People with RCC who are at high risk of the cancer returning can take sunitinib after kidney surgery. This may help to prevent the cancer from returning.
    • This type of therapy is called ‘adjuvant’ therapy. This means receiving additional cancer treatment after the first treatment (such as surgery) to lower the risk that the cancer will come back.
  • Sunitinib is an investigational treatment for RCC that has not yet spread to other parts of the body. Sunitinib blocks chemical messengers in the body that help cancer cells to grow.
  • Sunitinib also slows a cancer’s growth by blocking its ability to form new blood vessels.
  • This part of the study looked at people with RCC who were at high risk of their cancer returning after kidney surgery. People who took sunitinib lived longer without their cancer returning after kidney surgery compared with people who took a dummy drug with no active ingredients (known as a placebo).
  • In this analysis, researchers looked at the following:
    • Changes in certain genes. (Genes instruct cells to make proteins in a process called gene expression.)
    • How active certain groups of genes were. (This is known as the level of gene expression.)
    • How long people lived without their cancer returning.

 

Who took part in this study?

  • The researchers used small samples of the tumors removed during kidney surgery. They looked at the gene changes and the level of expression of groups of genes.

** A placebo does not contain any active ingredients. The placebo and study drug(s) will look alike.

What were the results of the study?

  • The results only show an association between how long people lived without their cancer returning and certain changes in genes or the level of gene expression. They do not prove that these changes in genes or the level of gene expression directly affected how long people lived without their cancer returning.

More results from this study can be found here:
View ESMO Scientific Abstract

What was the main conclusion reported by the researchers?

  • Looking at certain changes in genes or the level of gene expression could help identify the best treatment for people with RCC who are at high risk of their cancer returning.
    • Researchers want to do more studies to confirm the results of this study.

Who sponsored this study?

Pfizer Inc.
235 East 42nd Street NY, NY 10017
Phone (United States): +1 212-733-2323

Pfizer would like to thank all of the
people who took part in this study.

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